Urban Farming: A Return to Our Roots

You’re probably familiar with the concept of urban farming. Community gardens and farmers markets are popping up all over American cities and towns. People in these communities want this to be celebrated and encouraged so they have more accessible means to healthy food. And here’s a surprise…urban farming isn’t a new prospect; it’s a return...

The post Urban Farming: A Return to Our Roots appeared first on Well Org.

Read more »

Healthy Lessons From a Vegan

A Day in the Life of a Vegan What does it mean to be a vegan in modern times? Many misconceptions have manifested since it’s origins. But just what is it about the vegan lifestyle that keeps us coming back for more and how can we implement the benefits into our own lives (even if […]

Healthy Lessons From a Vegan is a post from: Well.org. Well.org designed and built by Colorado Local SEO marketing company 21st Century Technologies, Inc.

Read more »

Benefits Of A Plant Based Diet

How Much it Too Much We all know that vegetables should constitute a large portion of our diet.  A small side salad at dinner is just not going to cut it.  We have all heard the phrase eat the rainbow, but why?  Each one of the colorful vegetables represents a myriad of vitamins, minerals, enzymes […]

Benefits Of A Plant Based Diet is a post from: Well.org. Well.org designed and built by Colorado Local SEO marketing company 21st Century Technologies, Inc.

Read more »

A Beginner’s Guide To Backyard Chickens

As fans of the city, we often forget the benefits of the country. The calm, the open spaces, the soothing sounds of nature. And the last thing on your mind right now as a city-dwelling professional is probably where to fit a couple of chickens! The Benefits However, for those of us who do have […]

A Beginner’s Guide To Backyard Chickens is a post from: Well.org. Well.org designed and built by Colorado Local SEO marketing company 21st Century Technologies, Inc.

Read more »

Canging America’s Food Policy

CHANGING FOOD POLICY Eating in alignment with our values is a crucial crux to the future of our food system.  We can all make a difference and every dollar we spend counts.  Who are you voting for?  We all advocate brands whether we realize it or not.  It is paramount that we choose to support […]

Canging America’s Food Policy is a post from: Well.org. Well.org designed and built by Colorado Local SEO marketing company 21st Century Technologies, Inc.

Read more »

Clean Soil For Clean Food

The Soil Ecologist Molly Haviland is a “Soil Ecologist.” Her wake-up call came when she made the move from the beautiful outdoor playground that was Great Sand Dunes National Park to the man-manipulated monocropped fields of Iowa. As the child of a park ranger in Colorado, Molly was able to enjoy a range of outdoor […]

Clean Soil For Clean Food is a post from: Well.org. Well.org designed and built by Colorado Local SEO marketing company 21st Century Technologies, Inc.

Read more »

Urban Farming

Urban Farming A significant but ignored threat to our national security is the poor quality of our food supply. We live in a society where quick and easy takes precedence over quality and, in this case, health. The situation is particularly dire in poor communities where access and finances limit healthy food choices. Eugene Cooke […]

Urban Farming is a post from: Well.org. Well.org designed and built by Colorado Local SEO marketing company 21st Century Technologies, Inc.

Read more »

Modern Mediocrity: The Truth About Our Food Supply

Our ancestors survived and thrived by simply eating the foods nature provided to nourish and sustain them. We would love to be the ones to reveal to you that a typical modern diet alone could provide your body with even the minimum RDI of each essential micronutrient. Instead, we must face the fact that for the large majority of people, the reality of achieving essential micronutrient sufficiency through food alone is all but impossible.

Why are over 90% of the people living on the planet suffering from deficiencies in their micronutrients, or essential vitamins and minerals?

When one starts to dig for the answers it is essential that they start digging were the story begins—the soil. If minerals are not available in the soil, then they won’t be available in the food we eat—and over the past 100 years the level of minerals in the soil throughout the world has been on the decline, which was revealed at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development in 1992. While Australia’s farms showed the least depletion, with a 55-percent reduction in mineral content, America’s farm and rangeland showed the greatest amount, with a startling average mineral depletion of 85 percent. Crops grown in soils stripped of essential minerals produce foods that are also stripped of essential micronutrients. Essentially, when our soil is naked, our food is naked. Which ultimately means the calories we consume are … naked calories.

We are not suggesting a conspiracy theory that farmers or government agencies are purposely depleting our soil in order to make us sick. This is not what we believe. What we do know is that farmers are being paid to produce maximum yield per acre, not maximum nutritional value. As an example, according to the measurements taken by the USDA back in 1914, an apple used to contain 13.5 mg of calcium, 28.9 mg of magnesium, and 4.6 mg of iron. However, according to the USDA’s 1992 measurements, our depleted soil only yielded apples containing 7 mg of calcium (48.15% less), 5 mg of magnesium (82.7% less) and .18 mg of iron (96% less). And that was back in 1992.

But the soil is just the beginning. On average, that already depleted apple must travel over 1,700 miles to your kitchen, and every minute or every mile that your food travels, it loses micronutrients due to exposure to heat, light (UVs) and air (oxidation).

As if that weren’t enough, there are other practices that further strip our food of its nutrition. Factory farming, for example, which raises animals with unnatural feed in unnatural environments, takes its toll as well:

Wild fish have up to 380 percent more omega-3 than factory-farmed fish.

Grass-fed beef is loaded with more than 400 percent more vitamin A and vitamin E, and higher levels of the B vitamins, thiamine and riboflavin. It has greater amounts of calcium, magnesium, and potassium.  It is two to four times richer in heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids and 300 to 400 percent higher in conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), which [...]

Modern Mediocrity: The Truth About Our Food Supply is a post from: Well.org. Well.org designed and built by Colorado Local SEO marketing company 21st Century Technologies, Inc.

Read more »

A Bold New Stance by the United Nations

The UN threw a gauntlet this weekend at their General Assembly. The goals are meant to guide development priorities around the globe over the next 15 years. Critics say it is too ambitious but I say, “hell yes”. This is the kind of thinking we need right now and the UN has stepped into a nice leadership position by being bold here.

Let’s look at the 17 points and tease this out.

1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere.

This is one is ambitious and awesome. The target is to have no one living in extreme poverty — less than $1.25 (US) a day (anywhere) by the year 2030.

2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and…amazingly- promote sustainable agriculture.

This goal calls for a doubling of agricultural production by small-scale farmers. This is a huge move to help local farming and, hopefully can nudge more sustainable and organic practices everywhere.

3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages.

Global health is huge and pregnant woman are dying in the third world. That’s never OK and now the UN is going after it.

4. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for people around the globe.

They are saying that students everywhere should have free access to education through high school. BAM!

5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls.

Let’s end discrimination and violence toward women and girls. It also calls for the elimination of child marriage and female genital mutilation. This has been a long time coming and let’s push to get some traction on this ASAP.

 

6. Availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation.

Toilets and clean drinking water for everyone…good idea.

It calls for protecting and restoring natural water resources over the next five years. Many wars are already starting over clean water scarcity so this is a huge move.

7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all.

It calls for access to electricity and more renewable energy for all. I’d prefer it if they pushed harder for renewables here…

8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all.

Leveling the playing field and bringing prosperity to poor nations.

9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization…foster innovation.

Let’s modernize roads, dams, electrical grids and other infrastructure that’ll help economies grow and bring prosperity to all.

10. Reduce inequality within and among countries.

Let’s address the growing gap that’s emerged between the “haves” and the “have-nots.”

11. Make our cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable.

More green spaces and safe neighborhoods…make life livable everywhere.

12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns for food and industry.

Let’s stop being so wasteful and buy less of what we don’t need.

13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts.

They’ve been on this for a while…it is a big deal!

14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development.

This calls for sustainable management of fisheries by 2020 and elimination of water pollution by 2025.

15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse [...]

A Bold New Stance by the United Nations is a post from: Well.org. Well.org designed and built by Colorado Local SEO marketing company 21st Century Technologies, Inc.

Read more »

The Evolution (or Devolution) of Bees From a Former Beekeeper’s Perspective

Since 2006, commercial beekeepers have been seeing devastating declines in their hives’ health and longevity. Whereas it was considered normal to lose 10 percent of one’s hives over the winter hibernation, since 2006 the figures have been from 30 percent up to 100 percent in a bad year. Aside from being terrible for the beekeeper’s business, this death and decline also spells decline for many key crops that rely on the bees for their pollination – crops such as almonds, apples, blueberries, cantaloupe, cherries, cranberries, cucumbers, strawberries, pumpkins and watermelons, to name a few.

Almost everyone has heard something like this already.

Let’s stop and look at what’s wrong with this picture.

Honeybees make honey. That’s the first thing you associate with them, right? That’s why they’re called honeybees; their scientific moniker Apis mellifera also literally means “honey-bearing bee.” They make honey by visiting nectar-producing plants, gathering the nectar and bringing it to their hive. In the hive, designated worker bees evaporate the nectar from 80 percent water/20 percent sugar to the reverse, 80 percent sugar/20 percent water. This evaporated nectar, called honey, with protective plant chemicals suspended in it, is so stable that honey found in ancient Egyptian tombs was still edible after 1,100 years. Bees also gather pollen from flowers, not always the same as the nectar flowers, and store and consume it as their protein source.

In the course of gathering nectar and pollen, the bees incidentally pollinate the plants, consummating the plant lovemaking of pollen from male stamens onto female style that allows fruits (offspring) to be formed. It’s an ancient win-win symbiotic pact – the bees get their food; the plants get pollinated.

Normally, bees live in one spot, in their highly organized hive/colony, and cover a radius of 2-5 miles of varied terrain with diverse flora. Different plants will be in bloom at different times, and the bees always know. If they live near a field of clover, or an apple orchard, when those bloom the bees will be all over them, as they are great nectar sources as well as being agricultural crops that happen to require pollination. From several to a few dozen other hives overlap in radius, and if things get overcrowded a hive will swarm and find somewhere else to live.

So, what about those commercial beekeepers’ bees, who are dying off in droves, threatening the beekeepers’ livelihoods and the pollination of major crops? This is a very different picture. First off, these bees are industrially co-opted pollinators; no one cares about their honey production. In fact, they may end up getting fed quite a lot of cheap HFCS – yes, the dreaded high-fructose corn syrup; it’s not good for bees either – because they’re moved around so much that they don’t get to make much honey. By the way, several of those crops that rely on insect pollination are not great nectar suppliers. Ever heard of cucumber honey? Blueberry honey? Didn’t think so. In their normal life, the bees would pollinate these plants for [...]

The Evolution (or Devolution) of Bees From a Former Beekeeper’s Perspective is a post from: Well.org. Well.org designed and built by Colorado Local SEO marketing company 21st Century Technologies, Inc.

Read more »